A Delightful Daytrip: Morris Arboretum

For additional daytrip ideas, read the July 2016 issue of the QVNA Magazine.

A Historic Public Garden and Educational Institution
By Amy Grant

John and Lydia Morris, heirs to iron manufacturing firm the I.P. Morris Company, purchased this Chestnut Hill estate for their summer home in 1887.  Affectionately known as Compton, the land was initially barren but the Morrises eventually persevered in creating a landscape and sculpture garden devoted to beauty and knowledge.

The Morrises believed in the power of education and laid plans for a school and laboratory at Compton devoted to horticulture and botany.  In 1932, the estate was turned over to University of Pennsylvania and soon became an interdisciplinary resource center focusing on research, teaching, and outreach programs.  Today, the Morris Arboretum is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is recognized as the official arboretum of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Highlights here include: 92 acres of lush and colorful gardens featuring 12,000 labeled plants, trees, and flowers.  Specialty gardens designed by John and Lydia and some of the finest local architects of their time including an Azalea Meadow, an English Park, Wetlands, and a Swan Pond.

Admission: Children under 3: Free, Youth (3-17 years): $9.00, Students: $9.00, Adult: $17.00, Seniors (65+ years): $15.00

Hours: Open Daily 10am to 4pm; closed on New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day

Location: 100 E. Northwestern Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19118
Phone: 215.247.5777
Email: info@morrisarboretum.org
Website: www.business-services.upenn.edu/arboretum/

Tip: Picnicking in the garden is allowed in the designated picnic area behind the Widener Visitor Center.

 

Weigh in on the Soda Sugar Tax

Mayor Kenney’s budget address proposed ambitious new programs –  the most expensive proposals included  education initiatives  (pre kindergarten seats for 25,000 students at a cost of $256 million and 25 “community” schools), $350 million in infrastructure improvements, expenditures for energy efficiency and  $26 million for the $5 billion  pension deficit. Acknowledging the painful truth that what government provides in benefits it must pay for via taxes, the Mayor proposed Bill160176, a three cent per ounce tax on non alcoholic sweetened beverages to be levied on distributors, not retailers. Enclosed are the  portion of the Mayor’s  budget message addressing  this soda/sugar levy as well as the entire budget message.  Criticism of the proposal from  business and union interests, such as an op ed piece in the Philadelphia Business Journal, have been prompt and strident. Take a bit of time to read the Mayor’s proposal and the response from the business community THEN COMPLETE THE ATTACHED FOUR-QUESTION SURVEY TO PROVIDE YOUR THOUGHTS.

QVNA Unveils Winning Logo Design

Congratulations to Jon Kostesich for submitting the winning design for the Queen Village Neighbors Association (QVNA) Logo Design contest. Jon serves as an art director at HB&M and has been an active member of our community for almost 10 years.

Jon’s winning design incorporates two features that make Queen Village a distinctive Philadelphia neighborhood. Our eclectic mixture of historic and modern homes are represented with the silhouette of a row house. Our many green spaces and tree lined streets are conveyed in the color scheme along with the letter Q shaped to evoke a leaf.

Our new logo will soon appear on all official communications from QVNA and will be featured on our website, the Crier, and in other promotional materials.